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I am not aware of any research on the question that you ask. One reason could well be that governmental authorities in officially monolingual countries deem information about languages other than the official language irrelevant, or threatening integrity of ‘one country-one language’ ideologies. For example, recent research by Mark Sebba notes that “The 2011 UK Census was the first decennial census ever to ask a question about language in England”, a country where multilingualism is well attested otherwise. The pre-print article, which includes reference to other countries, is at

https://www.academia.edu/11388840/EnglishaforeigntongueThe2011CensusinEnglandandthemisunderstandingofmultilingualism

Madalena Cruz-Ferreira

I am not aware of any research on the question that you ask. One reason could well be that governmental authorities in officially monolingual countries deem information about languages other than the official language irrelevant, or threatening integrity of ‘one country-one language’ ideologies. For example, recent research by Mark Sebba notes that “The 2011 UK Census was the first decennial census ever to ask a question about language in England”, a country where multilingualism is well attested otherwise. The pre-print article, which includes reference to other countries, is at

https://www.academia.edu/11388840/EnglishaforeigntongueThe2011CensusinEnglandandthemisunderstandingofmultilingualism

Madalena Cruz-Ferreira

I am not aware of any research on the question that you ask. One reason could well be that governmental authorities in officially monolingual countries deem information about languages other than the official language irrelevant, or threatening integrity of ‘one country-one language’ ideologies. For example, recent research by Mark Sebba notes that “The 2011 UK Census was the first decennial census ever to ask a question about language in England”, a country where multilingualism is well attested otherwise. The pre-print article, which includes reference to other countries, is at

https://www.academia.edu/11388840/EnglishaforeigntongueThe2011CensusinEnglandandthemisunderstandingofmultilingualism

Madalena Cruz-Ferreira

I am not aware of any research on the question that you ask. One reason could well be that governmental authorities in officially monolingual countries deem information about languages other than the official language irrelevant, or threatening integrity of ‘one country-one language’ ideologies. For example, recent research by Mark Sebba notes that “The 2011 UK Census was the first decennial census ever to ask a question about language in England”, a country where multilingualism is well attested otherwise. The pre-print article, which includes reference to other countries, is at

https://www.academia.edu/11388840/EnglishaforeigntongueThe2011CensusinEnglandandthemisunderstandingofmultilingualism

Madalena Cruz-Ferreira
@MadalenaCruFer