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Swahili can have noun class markers (which are often likened to a grammatical gender system) on infinitives. However, this is only for objects so I don't think it can help resolve the control issues you're seeking to look into.

For example,

Ni-na-pend-a ku-ki-som-a 1s-pres-like-FV 15-7-read-FV 'I like to read it (7)'

The 'ki' noun class marker indicates that the thing read is in class 7 (kitabu, meaning book is in class 7).

However, there is still, presumably, subject control involving the first person singular marker 'ni'. Sorry

Swahili can have noun class markers (which are often likened to a grammatical gender system) on infinitives. However, this is only for objects so I don't think it can help resolve the control issues you're seeking to look into.

For example,

Ni-na-pend-a ku-ki-som-a 1s-pres-like-FV 15-7-read-FV 'I like to read it (7)'

The 'ki' noun class marker indicates that the thing read is in class 7 (kitabu, meaning book is in class 7).

However, there is still, presumably, subject control involving the first person singular marker 'ni'. Sorry

Swahili can have noun class markers (which are often likened to a grammatical gender system) on infinitives. However, this is only for objects so I don't think it can help resolve the control issues you're seeking to look into.

For example,

Ni-na-pend-a ku-ki-som-a -som-a

1s-pres-like-FV 15-7-read-FV

'I like to read it (7)'

The 'ki' noun class marker indicates that the thing read is in class 7 (kitabu, meaning book is in class 7).

However, there is still, presumably, subject control involving the first person singular marker 'ni'. Sorry