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"take a vaccine" vs. "get a vaccine"

In the last several months I've noticed the phrase "take a vaccine" in several newspapers (New York Times and others). I'd never heard it used before the pandemic, and I'd say "get a vaccine" or "be vaccinated"/"get vaccinated" (I grew up in northern NJ/NYC suburbs, for reference).

Has anyone else noticed this? Has been "take a vaccine" been used all along and I've somehow never noticed? Or has it come from some other English-speaking country and recently been adopted in the US?

Thanks for any insight you might have.

Edit: Yes, I'd read the WordReference thread--both the Brits and Americans there seemed to agree that "take a vaccine" wasn't something they'd heard and, like me, thought that it sounded odd. However, given that the thread is from 2017-2018 and I've only noticed the phrase being used since the pandemic started, I was hoping someone might have an idea of what caused its recent jump in usage.

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"take a vaccine" vs. "get a vaccine"

In the last several months I've noticed the phrase "take a vaccine" in several newspapers (New York Times and others). I'd never heard it used before the pandemic, and I'd say "get a vaccine" or "be vaccinated"/"get vaccinated" (I grew up in northern NJ/NYC suburbs, for reference).

Has anyone else noticed this? Has been "take a vaccine" been used all along and I've somehow never noticed? Or has it come from some other English-speaking country and recently been adopted in the US?

Thanks for any insight you might have.

Edit: Yes, I'd read the WordReference thread--both the Brits and Americans there seemed to agree that "take a vaccine" wasn't something they'd heard and, like me, thought that it sounded odd. However, given that the thread is from 2017-2018 and I've only noticed the phrase being used since the pandemic started, I was hoping someone might have an idea of what caused its recent jump in usage.