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2019-02-15 09:24:17 -0500 answered a question Could the word 'anger' be derived from the Zoroastrian god of evil 'Angra Mainyu'?

Recent research in Indo-European language's link with Tamil is revealing.Please refer to the Quora answer link text for

2019-02-12 20:29:27 -0500 answered a question Is "Fish fish fish eat eat eat" a grammatically correct sentence?

No.It's just a 'nouns and verbs'combo.May be a bit poetic but not a complete sentence.

2019-02-12 20:27:01 -0500 answered a question Ambiguity of they

In my view,there's no iota of ambiguity in the contract,though it could have been phrased much better."It shall be so th

2019-02-11 19:59:57 -0500 commented answer What is the etymology of the English word 'food'?

I do agree with your view.Yes,this was the impression of all linguists till a few IE scholars found out some facts recen

2019-02-10 17:06:02 -0500 edited answer What is the etymology of the English word 'food'?

The etymology for the word provided in link text seems inadequate as it gives an impression that the word is of Old Engl

2019-02-10 17:05:08 -0500 edited answer What is the etymology of the English word 'food'?

The etymology for the word provided in link text seems inadequate as it gives an impression that the word is of Old Engl

2019-02-10 17:03:25 -0500 answered a question What is the etymology of the English word 'food'?

The etymology for the word provided in https://www.etymonline.com/word/food#...v11754 seems inadequate as it gives an im

2019-02-10 12:49:24 -0500 commented question What is the most universal swear word in the world?

Please correct spelling errors" What is the most recognisable swear word in the worLd? My thoughts are that it is an Eng

2019-02-10 12:45:13 -0500 answered a question What is the most universal swear word in the world?

With about 6500 spoken languages in the world it would be unfair to expect a common swear word recognisable by all.Each

2019-02-04 23:41:00 -0500 asked a question What is the etymology of the English word 'food'?

What is the etymology of the English word 'food'? The etymology for the word provided in https://www.etymonline.com/word

2019-02-03 20:51:30 -0500 edited answer What is the link between glitter, glint, gleam, glow, glimmer, glisten, and glare?

Thank you for the good question.Here's my answer. GLITTER is 'flashing intermittently but continuously' E.g. All that

2019-02-03 20:49:11 -0500 answered a question What is the link between glitter, glint, gleam, glow, glimmer, glisten, and glare?

Thank you for the good question.Here's my answer. GLITTER is 'flashing intermittently but continuously' E.g. All that

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2019-01-20 05:20:23 -0500 edited answer Which language has the most advanced mensuration system in the world?

There's a widespread impression that the Greeks/Egyptians had the most advanced mathematical concepts in the world.Howev

2019-01-20 05:02:01 -0500 answered a question Which language has the most advanced mensuration system in the world?

There's a widespread impression that the Greeks/Egyptians had the most advanced mathematical concepts in the world.Howev

2019-01-19 16:17:40 -0500 asked a question Which language has the most advanced mensuration system in the world?

Which language has the most advanced mensuration system in the world? English has Trillion with 12 zeroes,as the most co

2019-01-19 15:52:04 -0500 answered a question What is the real etymology of the English word 'fuck'?

Real Etymology of English word ' fuck' The etymology of the English word 'fuck' has been a matter of discussion by the e

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2018-05-26 09:09:17 -0500 commented answer What are the defining qualities of a 'language'?

The difference between a 'code' and a 'language' is THAT CODE IS UNDERSTOOD BY SELECTED PEOPLE BUT LANGUAGE IS UNDERSTOO

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2018-04-28 06:54:47 -0500 commented answer What are the defining qualities of a 'language'?

Thank you for your comments.Point 3 says' LANGUAGE must be SPOKEN.If anything is NOT SPOKEN,IT IS NOT A LANGUAGE.' In a

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2018-03-30 02:56:27 -0500 edited answer What are the defining qualities of a 'language'?

We linguists talk about LANGUAGE all the time.What exactly is a LANGUAGE?What are the defining qualities of a LANGUAGE?S

2018-03-30 02:55:13 -0500 answered a question What are the defining qualities of a 'language'?

We linguists talk about LANGUAGE all the time.What exactly is a LANGUAGE?What are the defining qualities of a LANGUAGE?S

2018-03-29 02:14:52 -0500 asked a question What are the defining qualities of a 'language'?

What are the defining qualities of a 'language'? How do we identify a language?What essential qualities of any language

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2017-04-23 04:07:04 -0500 asked a question Proto Indo European Language

Proto Indo European Language I am on a research work in PIE.The link http://indo-european.info/dictionary-translator/li

2017-04-01 00:57:36 -0500 edited answer What is the real etymology of the English word 'fuck'?

The etymology of the English word 'fuck' has been a matter of discussion by the etymologists for long.The extant finding

2017-04-01 00:55:04 -0500 answered a question What is the real etymology of the English word 'fuck'?

The etymology of the English word 'fuck' has been a matter of discussion by the etymologists for long.The extant finding

2017-03-30 03:09:56 -0500 asked a question What is the real etymology of the English word 'fuck'?

What is the real etymology of the English word 'fuck'? The etymolgy of the word'fuck' available in various sources appea

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2016-09-16 01:55:11 -0500 answered a question Can Sanskrit be considered as a ‘Language’in conventional sense?

The relevant definition of 'language' as per is as follows: " a. Communication of thoughts and feelings through a system of arbitrary signals, such as voice sounds, gestures, or written symbols. b. Such a system including its rules for combining its components, such as words. c. Such a system as used by a nation, people, or other distinct community; often contrasted with dialect." According to Chomsky,'language'is: "'Language is a set (finite or infinite) of sentences, each finite in length, and constructed out of a finite set of elements'. Chomsky, Syntactic Structures (1957: 13). Comment on the definition of language given by Chomsky." The essential characterists of a human language is best provided in link awaiting moderation Applying the above characteristic features,its highly doubtful if Sanskrit can pass the test. • ’language’ is a medium of communication between a ‘people’ Comments:no.Sanskrit is limited to one sect of society ie. the Brahmins and gods only. • ‘language’ should have words with specific meanings Comments:ambiguous meanings for many Sanskrit words.Even the very word'Sanskrit' has ambiguous and questionable meanings attributed to it. Google says:sam=together;kr=make;samskratha=composed,elaborated.There is no evidence to support this etymology as there are no other word in Sanskrit' with 'sam' etymon. • ‘language” should be available to all willing people Comments:not made available to all. • ‘language’ should have a people speaking it. Comments:no record of any specific 'people' speaking it. What,then is 'Sanskrit' by nature? We hear about COBOL,Java,Fortran,C+ and many computer languages which we can’t speak.Here is a sample of javascript.

Table of Factorials

"); for(i = 1, fact = 1; i < 10; i++, fact *= i) { document.write(i + "! = " + fact); document.write("
"); } </script> </body> </html> Can you make anything out of it? Well,you can’t,because it is not meant for you to understand!It is a CODE meant to be understood by those who know the Code.It is not a language to be assigned along Tamil or English.Sanskrit is another coded language ,meant to understood by closed groups only.So it is safe to conclude that Sanskrit is not a language in the conventional sense.

2016-09-14 12:39:19 -0500 asked a question Can Sanskrit be considered as a ‘Language’in conventional sense?

What is a ’Language’ first of all? 1. ’language’ is a medium of communication between members of a ‘people’ 2. ‘language’ should have words with specific meanings 3. ‘language” should be available to all people willing to learn it. 4. ‘language’ should have a' people' speaking it. Let us apply these conditions and check whether Sanskrit fulfils the requirements of a language or not. • ’language’ is a medium of communication between a ‘people’---no.Sanskrit is limited to one seect of society ie. the Brahmins and gods only. • ‘language’ should have words with specific meanings---ambiguous meanings for many Sanskrit words. • ‘language” should be available to all willing people----not made available to all. • ‘language’ should have a people speaking it.---no record of any specific 'people' speaking it. What are your views in the matter?Is there any other 'language' spoken in the world, which has similar qualities?

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2015-12-10 01:50:41 -0500 answered a question Is there a language with an interrogative verb?

If I have understood your question right,I guess Tamil language has lot of interrogative verbs.Eg."Won't you listen to what I say ?" in Tamil would be "Sonna kekka maate ?" The lost word 'maate' is an interrogative verb.'Pannitaya?"பண்ணிட்டயா ? means 'Have you done it ?' and is an interrogative verb.Hope this helps.