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2017-07-13 11:09:24 -0400 edited question We are practicing ‘bleded learning’ in teaching most of the minor courses. I am wondering which teaching instruction is more effective in teaching grammar for blended learning education.

We are practicing ‘blended learning’ in teaching most of the minor courses. I am wondering which teaching instruction i

2017-03-09 15:49:43 -0400 received badge  Editor (source)
2017-03-09 15:49:43 -0400 edited answer Corpus of classroom talk

What language are you looking for? I found a corpus of Portuguese high school speech, but if you're looking for English,

2017-03-09 15:49:11 -0400 answered a question Corpus of classroom talk

What language are you looking for? I found a corpus of Portuguese high school speech (link below); if you're looking for

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2017-01-24 16:47:15 -0400 answered a question Hungarian and Irish - links?

There is no link between the two languages genetically. They are from two different language families, Indo-European and Uralic.

The words for "woman" do not appear to have any connection.

  • Irish bean, meaning "woman", has the genitive singular form mná, and both are descended from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *gʷḗn, also meaning "woman".

  • Hungarian , "woman", is descended from Proto-Uralic *näxi, also meaning "woman".

However, I was not able to find an origin for the Hungarian for "man":

  • Irish fear, meaning "man", has the genitive singular form fir, and both are descended from the PIE *wiHrós, also meaning "man".

  • Hungarian férfi: ??? It's possible that this word was originally a loan word from an Indo-European language nearby. Hungarian has loan words from Iranian, Germanic, Slavic and other languages (as well as some non-Indo-European languages).

I would say that they are probably not related in any way, but you never know. Let us know if you find anything else about the etymology of this word!

Sources:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bean#E...

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fear#I...

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/n%C5%91

2017-01-24 16:11:12 -0400 answered a question Can you tell me the origins and/or meaning of the word "achristavest"? Or is it a made-up word?

I can't find any references to that word, except for a waterfront development company called Achristavest. Have you heard it in some other context?

2017-01-24 15:46:42 -0400 received badge  Supporter (source)
2017-01-24 15:46:23 -0400 answered a question Synonyms that are Identical Except for Prefix

I don't know if there's a word for what you're talking about. However, there is a thread on reddit where users made a list of words like this: https://www.reddit.com/r/linguistics/...iterateandreiteratemeanthesame_thing/

A related term is auto-autonym, or contranym, where a word can mean two different and opposite things: for example, cleave can mean to cling or to separate. Here's a Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auto-an...

2017-01-24 15:03:02 -0400 received badge  Teacher (source)
2017-01-24 15:02:42 -0400 answered a question English word stress

Good question! What you're seeing is "L1 interference". L1 stands for someone's first language--Italian in your granddaughter's case. When someone learns a second language (L2), their L1 will influence what they learn. Language learning is tricky, and our brains try to learn by using what they already know! English stress tends to fall on the first syllable, while Italian tends toward the penultimate (second to last) syllable. Your granddaughter's knowledge of Italian is influencing how she speaks English.

You can read more about this phenomenon here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languag...

Hope this helps!