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2015-04-26 22:54:31 -0500 commented answer What are the phonological process rules for homorganic nasals?

Thank you! :)

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2015-04-26 03:58:48 -0500 asked a question What are the phonological process rules for homorganic nasals?

Greetings! Re: Homorganic nasal phonological rules

My questions is probably simple and obvious to you, but I'm a little confused here!

I understand the main idea; that homorganic nasalisation is a process of assimilation to varying degrees, and primarily involves the use of affixes - if we just concentrate on the underlying affix form 'un' or 'in'...

(In English): bilabial /m/ shares the same place of articulation with /p/ and /b/ alveolar /n/ shares the same place of articulation with /t/, /d/, /s/, /z/ and /l/ velar /ŋ/ shares the same place of articulation with /k/ and /g/

But I'm just not sure how to write the rules properly (non-linearly).

In the word 'inadequate' [ɪnædəkwət], I see that the vowel becomes nasalized, therefore: V → Vⁿ __ [N] (" A vowel becomes a nasalized vowel when it occurs before a nasal")

For words such as 'impossible' [ɪmpɑsəbəl], we assume the underlying prefix form is actually [in] (is that right?), therefore the process of assimilation would be something like: prefix [ɪn] --> [ɪm] / _ [bilabial sound] (meaning that the prefix 'in' assimilates to 'im' preceding a bilabial sound like /p/) Am I on the right track here?

and 'incorrect' [ɪnkərɛkt] [ɪn] --> [ɪŋ] / __ [velar sound] (meaning that the prefix 'ɪn' assimilates to 'ɪŋ' when it precedes a velar sound like /k/) Does this make sense?

Finally, approximants /l/ and /r/, for example: 'irregular' [ɪrɛgjələr], and 'illegal' [ɪligəl]... one precedes a short vowel, the other precedes a long vowel - (Is that relevant?) Was the underlying prefix form also 'in', but the sounds have assimilated due to the place of articulation (as above) and been fully changed? Something like:

[ɪn] --> [ɪr] / _ [r]

[ɪn] --> [ɪl] / _ [l]

???

Any help to formalize the phonological rules so that they are actually correct would be oh-so awesome and I would really appreciate it! Most of the resources I have give good explanations but not an example of the actual phonological rule.

Many thanks in advance!

J :)